Former US Rep. Anthony Weiner appearing in federal court in sexting case

Former US Rep. Anthony Weiner appearing in federal court in sexting case

According to NBC News, numerous media outlets published transcripts of sexually explicit conversations that took place between Weiner and young women he met online. Weiner's brother was the only family in court to watch as he said he "hit bottom" and began therapy.

In a written plea agreement, prosecutors said aggravating factors such as the age of the victim would have called for a prison sentence of up to 14 years under sentencing guidelines were it not for the plea bargain and a 10-year maximum penalty on the charge. The FBI has obtained a warrant to begin reviewing newly discovered emails that may be relevant to the Hillary Clinton email server investigation, a law enforcement official told The Associated Press.

Weiner turned himself in to the FBI Friday morning and was at federal court at 500 Pearl St., in Manhattan for the arraignment.

Weiner, who could go to prison, pleaded guilty to a single count of transmitting obscene material to a minor.

The plea, a source told the Times, is expected to cover Weiner's conduct from January to March of 2016.

"I have a sickness, but I do not have an excuse", Weiner said, apologising to the 15-year-old girl to whom he sent sexually explicit images and messages last year.

Officials began to investigate Weiner over the allegations previous year, and the probe into Weiner even affected the 2016 presidential campaign.

Investigation of his laptop led to the discovery of a cache of emails from Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to her aide Huma Abedin, Weiner's wife.

On Oct. 28, a week and a half before the election, the Federal Bureau of Investigation told Congress that it was reopening an inquiry into Clinton's use of a private email server while she was Secretary of State because investigators found her emails on Weiner's laptop, which had been seized in the sexting case.

This temporarily reopened the probe into Clinton just days before the presidential election, and Clinton recently blamed part of her loss on it.

In testimony to Congress two weeks ago, Comey said he felt "mildly nauseous" at the suggestion his actions may have swayed the election, but added that he had no regrets.

Weiner resigned from Congress in June 2011 after explicit pictures in an unrelated case became public, CNN reported.

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