Joe Lieberman Is Top Pick for FBI Director

Joe Lieberman Is Top Pick for FBI Director

Politico, CNN and NBC News all reported Thursday that Lieberman is the frontrunner to succeed James Comey, the controversial, high-profile director who was sacked last week by President Donald Trump.

Trump has said he could name a director before he leaves the country Friday on his first overseas trip as president.

The firing drew instant criticism from both sides of the aisle, as Comey was overseeing the investigation into Russia's meddling in the 2016 U.S. election and any possible links between the Trump camp and Russian Federation during the campaign.

One of the sources said President Donald Trump found the Democrat-turned-independent "agreeable" after meeting with him.

Lieberman, 75, who served in the Senate from 1989-2013, first as a Democrat and then as an independent, met with Trump at the White House on Wednesday afternoon to discuss leading the law enforcement agency. He also backed Republican Sen. He also reportedly worked with Trump on several other cases.

"I was disappointed because the president of the United States had just confessed to engaging in an extramarital affair with a young woman in his employ and to willfully deceiving the nation about his conduct", Lieberman said, later adding, "The implications for our country are so serious that I feel a responsibility to my constituents in CT, as well as to my conscience, to voice my concerns forthrightly and publicly".

Among their concerns was Mr Lieberman's past praise of Mr Michael Flynn, Mr Trump's first national security adviser, who was sacked in February after misleading officials about his conversations with Russian officials.

"I'm very close to choosing an Federal Bureau of Investigation director", Trump told television news anchors during a private lunch at the White House, according to CNN's Jake Tapper.

Lieberman seemed to agree with the sentiment, as he was photographed leaving the White House with a big thumbs up. He did not seek re-election in 2012.

Also, some Democrats are skeptical about Lieberman's independence from Trump given that the two are now in an attorney-client relationship. He has served as co-chairman of No Labels, a centrist group that promotes bipartisanship.

Speaking to reporters at an off the record lunch, and reiterating the comments on camera moments later, Trump called former Sen.

Keating was a two-term Republican governor of Oklahoma with his tenure covering the 1995 Oklahoma City bombings.

Among their concerns was Lieberman's past praise of Michael Flynn, Trump's first national security adviser, who was sacked in February after misleading officials about his conversations with Russian officials.

Keating told his hometown newspaper after the interview that he doesn't expect to be chosen.

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