Senate Expected to Give House Health Care Plan the Cold Shoulder

Senate Expected to Give House Health Care Plan the Cold Shoulder

Though House Republicans celebrated the bill - even carting in cases of beer after the vote - lawmakers and pundits on both sides of the aisle agreed that the Senate was unlikely to pass the bill as it was written. The Senate plans to draft its own healthcare legislation in the coming weeks.

Another target is Rep. Dave Brat of Virginia, a member of the House Freedom Caucus, the group of conservative Republicans whose objections to an earlier version of the bill helped scuttle a House vote scheduled for late March.

"That is an important issue to me because I don't think that low-income women should be denied their choice of health care providers, for family planning, cancer screenings, for well women care (but) it's not the only issue in this huge bill", she said.

President Donald Trump talks with House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, May 4, 2017, after the House pushed through a health care bill. The American Hospital Association said the bill would destroy Medicaid, the state-federal health insurance program for the poor that expanded under the Affordable Care Act.

He also claimed that Obamacare "was a lie and it is dead".

Collins also said she'd like to see a bipartisan group in the Senate working on a bill, with Democrats acknowledging that the PPACA has problems and Republicans making sure coverage is not reduced.

Dems look to curb Trump's nuclear strike powers MORE (D-Mass.) says that it is "impossible" for House and Senate Republicans to agree on a plan to repeal and replace ObamaCare. It would dilute consumer-friendly insurance coverage requirements, like prohibiting higher premiums for customers with pre-existing medical conditions.

Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price on Sunday defended cutting almost a trillion dollars from Medicaid in the GOP-backed health-care plan as being necessary to fix a "fundamentally flawed" system - and give people the coverage they need.

Trump said Sunday on his Twitter account, just days after the House narrowly voted to repeal the seven-year-old health law popularly known as Obamacare.

As of now, because the GOP pushed to vote before a new CBO score was released, it is unclear how much the new health care legislation would cost or how many people might lose their coverage. "The Senate will complete the job".

"It's up to the Senate to make improvements if they're to be made", he said.

Collins and Ryan appeared on ABC's "This Week", Price was on NBC's "Meet the Press" and on CNN's "State of the Union" with Kasich, while Mulvaney was interviewed on CBS' "Face the Nation".

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