Colon, breast, ovarian cancer survival rates lower in blacks than whites

Colon, breast, ovarian cancer survival rates lower in blacks than whites

But the authors conclude that the Dutch mammography screening program seems to have little impact on the burden of advanced breast cancers, which suggests a marginal effect on breast cancer mortality.

The cases of breast cancer have rapidly deteriorated in Netherland since a countrywide screening program commenced in 1989.

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) - Physicians who report a social network member with a poor breast cancer prognosis are more likely to recommend routine breast cancer screening for younger and older age groups, according to a research letter published online Dec. 4 in JAMA Internal Medicine. The aim of the study was to determine if women preferred annual or biennial screening, and to investigate whether or not reported harms of mammography influenced this preference.

The frequency at which women should receive screening mammography remains controversial in the United States. Physicians who report a social network member with a poor breast cancer prognosis are more likely to recommend routine breast cancer screening for younger and older age groups, according to a research letter published online December 4 in JAMA Internal Medicine. Therefore, a team, led by Philippe Autier at the International Prevention Research Institute in France, undertook an update of the incidence of different stages of breast cancer among women of all ages in the Netherlands from 1989 to 2012. The experience was categorized as being diagnosed through screening or not; having a poor prognosis or a good prognosis; or having an unknown screening or prognosis. The researchers also broke down recommendations based on which guidelines were trusted most.

As more women were invited to join the screening program and the screenings became more high-tech, the overall benefit of those mammograms fell. In general, physicians largely recommended screening to women age 40 and older. In an accompanying editorial, authors from the University of Washington School of Medicine, noted that with widely varying mammography referral rates, physicians need to be aware of their own beliefs around screening.

ReferenceRadhakrishnan A, Nowak SA, Parker AM, Visvanathan K, Pollack CE. The efficacy of breast cancer screening is at the heart of a congress this week in Lille.

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