Upcoming Gmail redesign will also herald the arrival of self-destructing emails

Upcoming Gmail redesign will also herald the arrival of self-destructing emails

And as we inch closer to the official launch, reports of the new features have begun pouring in abundance. "But it doesn't seem to be stopping Google as the company is now evolving beyond the simple POP3/IMAP/SMTP protocols", the report reads. G Suite customers apparently received word about this Gmail redesign - so check your inbox ASAP because there's another important feature to take note of: emails self-destruct. Once turned on for a specific message, the user won't be able to copy, download, forward, or even print it. A user can set the expiration date for the email following which the mail would be deleted at the time set by the user. This will likely make Gmail easier to load and use, and will also bring new features to the popular open email platform. However, the feature is still under development, as the option "Learn More" now redirects to a blank page. The recipient had to log into their Google account once again to view the content. According to TechCrunch, the Confidential Mode feature could be released at the same time or could be delayed to a subsequent update.

As of now, it's unknown whether the feature is going to be compatible with non-Gmail users. They then added virtual noises mimicking a crowd, all playing at the same time, to teach the system to separate multiple audio tracks into different parts so it could learn to differentiate between each sound.

TechCrunch also pointed out that when a ProtonMail user sends an expiring message to another ProtonMail user, the email looks like a regular email in the box. On the other hand, Google generates an email with a link in Gmail's current implementation.

You'll be able to snooze emails so that they reappear in your inbox hours or days later.

The features are nearly similar to some of the features found in Microsoft's full Outlook application as Microsoft is also adding the ability to restrict emails on its Outlook.com service.

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