US Auto Safety Agency Is Probing Utah Crash of Tesla on Autopilot

US Auto Safety Agency Is Probing Utah Crash of Tesla on Autopilot

The driver of the Unified fire vehicle was examined for whiplash-related injuries at the scene but was not taken to the hospital for treatment.

"Consistent with NHTSA's oversight and authority over the safety of all motor vehicles and equipment, the agency has launched its special crash investigations team to gather information on the South Jordan, Utah, crash".

At the time, she told the police that the vehicle was on Autopilot and later admitted that she was on her phone.

According to a statement released South Jordan released Wednesday, Tesla technicians recovered data recorded by the vehicle and they found the driver had repeatedly engaged, canceled and re-engaged the car's Autosteer and Traffic Aware Cruise Control functions. On two such occasions, she had her hands off the wheel for more than one minute each time and her hands came back on only after a visual alert was provided.

"When using Autopilot, drivers are continuously reminded of their responsibility to keep their hands on the wheel and maintain control of the vehicle at all times", the spokeswoman said.

Whether an Autopilot feature was engaged when a Model S collided with the rear of a stopped fire truck in the USA state of Utah on May 11 remained to be confirmed.

Huang's hands were "not detected on the wheel for six seconds prior to the collision", Tesla said in the blog.

Specifically, the IIHS found that the Model 3's automatic braking worked extremely well while traveling at both 12 miles per hour and 25 miles per hour. This is the speed the driver selected. After a fatal Tesla Model X crash on Highway 101 in Mountain View in March, Tesla reported that the driver of that vehicle had been warned repeatedly during the trip to put his hands on the wheel, and that his hands were not detected on the wheel for six seconds before the collision.

Also, the Autopilot technology that monitors whether a driver has their hands on the steering wheel isn't a good way to tell if the driver is paying attention, the NTSB said.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is dispatching a team to investigate a recent crash in South Jordan in which the driver of a Tesla vehicle reported she had placed the auto on autopilot mode at the time of the crash, Reuters reports.

Media coverage of Tesla accidents aside, there's no denying that Tesla vehicles are engineered to be some of the safest cars on the planet.

NHTSA's special crash team is different from the agency's Office of Defect Investigation.

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