Ivanka Trump accused of tweeting 'fake' Chinese proverb

Ivanka Trump accused of tweeting 'fake' Chinese proverb

"'Those who say it cannot be done, should not interrupt those doing it.' -Chinese Proverb", Ivanka posted on Monday, the night before her father and Kim came together to seek an end to a tense decadesold nuclear stand-off. Her six-year-old daughter, Arabella Kushner, became an online sensation by singing ballads in Mandarin and reciting Chinese poetry in a video that was shown to President Xi Jinping during Mr Trump's visit to Beijing last year.

In just a matter of hours, her tweet was liked by tens of thousands of people, but many were left confused as to why she thought the proverb was Chinese.

Some said this sort of stereotyping was common among Americans, who often mistakenly attribute pithy sayings to Chinese sages, perhaps to give them an added aura of wisdom.

The first daughter and senior presidential adviser sent off what seemed to be a note of encouragement as her dad sat down in Singapore with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

Many pointed towards a classic Chinese idiom: "A true gentleman should keep silent while watching a chess game".

But seconds later, the social media community started to point out there was little evidence to suggest the saying originated in China, reports the New York Times.

Others took the opportunity to create their own "Chinese proverb", while some accused her of spreading "fake news".

Another said: "It makes sense, but I still don't know which proverb it is". "Some said, 'maybe Ivanka saw it on a fortune cookie, ' which despite the name isn't of Chinese origin either".

It's not the first time she has incorrectly described a quotation as Chinese.

US President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping, with Ivanka Trump at far left, at dinner at Mar-a-Lago a year ago.

In 2015, the Quote Investigator found that the saying also was published in a 1962 periodical with the words "Confucius say" - a popular format for jokes about proverbs not actually attributable to the Chinese philosopher, according to The Hill.

'But why are Trump WH (White House) aides giving our proverbs to China, increasing our proverb deficit?' he quipped.

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